Doris Day, Hollywood Actress And Singer, Dies Aged 97

Doris Day, a Hollywood legend and a honey-voiced singer, whose dramas, films, musicals, and innocent romantic comedies made her a top star in the 1950s and 1960s has died. She was 97.

The news of Doris Day was confirmed by Doris Day Animal Foundation on Monday at her Camel Valley, California home.

The foundation said Doris was surrounded by close friends during her demise.

According to the foundation through an emailed statement, they said:

“Day had been in excellent physical health for her age, until recently contracting a serious case of pneumonia, resulting in her death.”

With her wholesome blonde beauty, glowing smile, and lilting contralto, Doris Day became a top star by staring in numerous films.

The singer and an actress starred in films such as Pillow Talk and Calamity Jane. She had a hit in 1956 with Que Sera, Sera,

“Whatever Will Be, Will Be.”

Doris Mary Ann Von Kappelhoff was born in April 1922.

Her dream was to become a dancer, but she broke her right leg in a car accident. This made her abandon her dancer dream and chose to become a singer.

She started her singing career at 15, and her first hit “Sentimental Journey” became a signature tune during her times.

Doris became an Iconic actor throughout the world after releasing her first films which included Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Man Who Knew Too Much” and “That Touch of Mink.”

Although she didn’t win an Academy Award, she was nominated for her Pillow Talk film, a romantic comedy with Hudson, in 1960.

Doris Day also received honors including the Presidential Medal of freedom in 2004 and Grammy lifetime achievement in 2008.

She started singing in a Cincinnati radio station, then a local night club, and then in New York.

Her last compilation album, “My Heart,” became a top 10 hit throughout the UK in 2011.

Regardless of her fame, Doris Day was ridiculed by some rivals for her wholesomeness and girl-next-door image.

Oscar Levant, a musician, had once commented:

“I’ve been around so long, I knew Doris Day before she was a virgin.”

Her marriage life wasn’t as sunny. Her first marriage happened when she was 17 years. She married four times, got divorced thrice and widowed once.

Doris Day also suffered stress and depression especially when one of her husbands squandered her money. This caused her a severe financial crisis.

She changed her name to Day after releasing a song, “Day after Day,” to fit it on the marquee.

Her last film was “With Six You Get Eggroll,” a 1968 comedy about a widow and a widower and the problems they faced when blending their families.

And in the 1770s she abandoned her acting career and begun focusing on animal welfare foundation.

Doris Day fought against animal testing and advocated for neuter education and outreach projects in the US.

She wished not to have a memorial service, funeral or grave marker, according to the organization.

The world has lost not only a Hollywood legend but also a fantastic person. Her legacy will always be remembered through her outstanding performances.

We’ll never have another Doris Day. May she rest in peace.